FAQ's

A bond measure is like a home mortgage with principal and interest to be paid off over a set period of time. The State of Oregon does not provide funding to school districts for school construction, building improvements and preservation of facilities. School districts in Oregon use bonds to finance these capital expenses and large maintenance projects.

No. The Oregon Department of Education does not provide funding for school construction or major renovation. It does, however, provide the dollars that we utilize to deliver instruction to students and operate.

Oregon’s school funding model is somewhat unique. The legislature allocates dollars each year for teaching and learning, but construction of new schools and the modernization and preservation of existing schools is the responsibility of the local community. Funds for capital construction can be raised through elections and the support of community members for local tax levies.

Oregon is one of the few states in the nation that does not provide direct funding support from the state for building schools or major capital renovations. School districts are expected to finance these projects with general obligation bonds (construction bonds) authorized by the district’s local voters.

If you’ve had kids in school or were a public school student yourself, people before you paid for the schools you and/or your child(ren) attended. Similarly, the current residents of the North Bend School District help pay for the schools we have now and those we build and improve in the future throughout the time they live here. As new residents move into the district’s attendance area, they assume these taxes as well. Regardless of where you live in Oregon, you will be paying for the schools in that area.

Strong schools increase property values and safe schools help ensure safe neighborhoods. Our students are our future workforce, homeowners and taxpayers. Their education prepares them for that next step into adulthood, and the stronger their foundation the better their outcomes.

If the proposed bond measure passes, tax payers would see an increase of $0.77 per $1,000 of taxable assessed value (which differs from real market value). For example, owners of a home with assessed value (not market value) of $300,000 could expect to pay $231 more per year or $19.25 more per month.

The average age of a school in North Bend School District is 59 years and some are over 70 years old. Although we’ve worked hard to preserve our community’s assets, we have aging buildings. Over time, the number of students in our classrooms has increased, safety and security concerns have changed, and basic systems like electrical, heating, plumbing and roofs are aging and do not function as designed in some schools. Lastly, the district seeks to make various building updates to expand career and vocational education (CTE) facilities, enhance student performing arts spaces, and improve school nurse spaces.

No. The district will continue to maintain school properties but the proposed projects will not occur.

Yes, the State of Oregon does offer matching funds through its Oregon School Capital Improvement Matching Program and the North Bend School District would be awarded a matching funds grant of $4 million if the proposed bond measure passes.

No.  All funds raised by the bond will go to improve schools in the North Bend School District and they can only be spent on projects approved by voters.

Yes. An independent citizen Bond Oversight Committee would be established to oversee the use of bond funds if the bond passes in addition to regular, independent audits.

Communities with good schools can impact home values, encourage people to stay and invest in the local area, and can supply the local economy with better skilled workers. Additionally, good schools can improve community pride, connections, and a sense of belonging.

A community with good schools can positively affect home values, area pride, business attractiveness and help shape the future workforce. Students can go on to be skilled workers and engaged citizens that contribute to the local economy and community in various ways. 

School facilities provide community organizations gathering spaces for sporting activities and various events. Our schools have been rented on various occasions for major events and bring in visitors to our community, who spend money at our local restaurants, hotels, and businesses.

North Bend High School’s graduation rate is higher than the Oregon state graduation.